Kinfolk Collective explores untold narratives of the African Diaspora through speculative film ‹ The Visibility Project

Julian Walker, co-founder of the Kinfolk Collective.

In an aesthetically stunning scene from a film titled ‘Third Timothy,’ a young Black boy fills two glass bottles with water from a waterfall in the woods. The trees are bare and the sky is grey. Barefoot, the boy walks slowly on wet rocks trimmed with damp autumn leaves.

The boy aims to peddle the bottles as holy water with his brother. Together, they travel the rural South selling fake holy water to people desperate for miracles in hopes of escaping their abusive foster home to live with their uncle. The boys witness preachers in their community take collection for the church and use it for their personal gain, influencing them to take advantage of people to make better lives for themselves.

Third Timothy’ was written and directed by Julian Walker of the Kinfolk Collective, a group of filmmakers out of Chicago who “trace the overlaps and commonalities between members of the African Diaspora.” Walker co-founded the collective with videographer Darren Wallace.

Walker grew up in a community heavily influenced by Christianity. Watching corrupt preachers use collection funds for their personal benefit prompted him to make the film. ‘Third Timothy’ aims to explore social issues in the Bible Belt, specifically racism, religion, corruption and poverty. “There are many depictions and conversations surrounding the idea of crooked pastors,” said Walker, “but how many have you seen explore the effects of their actions on young people? How many times have you had an 11-year-old boy try to sell you holy water? I intend to take a fresh approach to the ‘crooked preacher’ issue by showing these situations and more in ‘Third Timothy.’

The Kinfolk Collective also have a number of other projects, including an Artist Portrait film about Chicago-based rapper Tree called ‘Damn Near Made It,’ and an experimental short called ‘Bluebird’ featuring a reading of the Charles Bukowski poem by the same name. Their latest project, ‘Savage vs. The Void,’ premiered on April 25, 2014 in Chicago, and explores the feelings Wallace experienced after the execution of Troy Davis. Watch more short films by the Kinfolk Collective here.

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Kinfolk Collective explores untold narratives of the African Diaspora through speculative film ‹ The Visibility Project.

On Moya Bailey, Misogynoir, and why both are important ‹ The Visibility Project

Known for creating the termMisogynoir, Bailey defines it as the intersection of racism, anti-Blackness, and misogyny that Black women experience. The term is specific to Black womanhood, as Misogynoir cannot be experienced by women of any other race, but can be perpetuated by people of any gender or race.

On Moya Bailey, Misogynoir, and why both are important ‹ The Visibility Project.

Same Ol’ Tropes: ABC’s new series, ‘Selfie,’ with John Cho and Da’Vine Joy Randolph falls short ‹ The Visibility Project

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The protagonist, Eliza Dooley (Gillan), is a social media obsessed 20-something with perpetually pursed lips, 263,000 online followers and no real friends. Following a humiliating public breakup, she decides she would rather form relationships with the people around her instead of ‘friending’ people on the Internet. She hires co-worker and marketing expert Henry Higenbottam (Cho) to rebrand her image.

Same Ol’ Tropes: ABC’s new series, ‘Selfie,’ with John Cho and Da’Vine Joy Randolph falls short ‹ The Visibility Project.

Diane Humetewa, first female Native judge on federal bench ‹ The Visibility Project

Diane Humetewa made history in Arizona on Wednesday as the first Native woman federal judge elected to the U.S. District Court. She was voted in unanimously in a 96-0 vote and will fill one of the six vacancies on the federal bench. Humetewa is the first woman and the third Native in American history to be confirmed as a federal judge.

Diane Humetewa, first female Native judge on federal bench ‹ The Visibility Project.

Multi-racial BARE Project takes contemporary ‘real beauty’ campaigns one step further ‹ The Visibility Project

Multi-racial BARE Project takes contemporary ‘real beauty’ campaigns one step further ‹ The Visibility Project.